Germany runs out of gas in F1

Since 1991, when Michael Schumacher arrived, Germany has always had a driver on the Formula 1 grid, and three of them are also world champions, Michael himself, Sebastian Vettel and Nico Rosberg, but it could stop being that way in 2023.

Vettel’s departure at the end of this year, in fact withdrawal, leaves the flag of his country on the shoulders of Mick Schumacher, since since 2019 there is also no German Grand Prix and the successful Mercedes has a base and half a team in England for both chassis and engines: Brackley and Brixworth. Even their champion is English.

It would be a shame if we didn’t have a German driver next year or in the near future, because at the moment I don’t see anyone coming from Germany in the next ten years.

Norbert Vettel (Father of Sebastian Vettel)

mick lt;HIT gt;schumacher lt;/HIT gt; Sebastian Vettel

Haas has not yet commented on the matter and postpone it to next week in Abu Dhabi, but Mick has already lost the support or link with Ferrari, of which he was an Academy driver, and his future lies in staying where he is or with Williams, and in both cases with powerful rivals. He could be replaced by Hlkeberg, also German at least, although he would still be in a smaller team. At the moment Ecclestone’s words, already out of F1 but with all contacts intact, inviting him to “forget about F1”, or Magnussen’s polethe day he comes out last, that’s more nails in his sports coffin, unless Liberty juggles not to lose her last name.

The Germans benefited from a great exaggeration that was undoubtedly caused by my brother. There was great interest in Germany, also in terms of marketing, television and viewers. That has changed a bit

Ralf Schumacher

as things, the most powerful country in Europe, and with the most champions (12) after England (20), lives on the brink of a sporting abyss unprecedented in this century, a consequence of both the economic crisis and the lack of academy. And of a pilot who drags passions like Michael, because neither Sebastian nor Nico made it. Far away are, a decade ago, the grill populated by those who grew up in the shadow of the Kaiser, Vettel, Rosberg, Hulkenberg, Sutil, Heidfeld or Glocksometimes coinciding up to six at a time as in 2011. “The Germans benefited from a great hype that was undoubtedly caused by my brother. There was a great interest in Germany, also in terms of marketing, television and viewers. That has changed a bit,” acknowledges Ralf Schumacher.

On the one hand, there is the lack of support for tracks like Hockenheim, since the fee for the race was paid by the community there and by Mercedes itself until they got tired of it. They do not receive aid from the State either at the Nurburgring and, as all the routes are deficient, your support is vital to face a payment of about 30 million to organize a race.

After that there is a cut of pilots. The journey to F1, calculated by Ralf Schumacher himself, rises to 15 million to reach the ‘Great Circus’ and the increase in karting is shocking to the point that many of the drivers in their powerful championships are not German and the teams and sponsors invest in raw talent, even if it is foreign. “It would be a shame if we didn’t have a German driver next year or in the near future, because at the moment I don’t see anyone coming from Germany in the next ten years,” said Sebastian Vettel’s father, Norbert. “We are not having kart tracks either, so without plants it is difficult to have trees,” says Ralf, who has built his own circuit.

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In any case, it should be a passenger because in 2026 Audi arrives with its own team and headquarters in Germany although associated with Sauber, which is in Switzerland. And as his boss Adam Baker acknowledged to MARCA, “it would be interesting against a German driver, but we will decide on talent and not passport.” I mean, if they can, they will. Porsche should also soon announce its entry into the heat of the new engine regulations in that same season to give Germany gas again in F1.

Germany runs out of gas in F1